U.S. Department of State to Embassy Santiago, «[Deleted] Reports on Death of Charles Horman,» May 14, 1987
In response to the embassy’s previous cable (Document 2), Michael Armacost, the under secretary of state for political affairs, questions the credibility of the informant who provided the account of Horman’s death.  Even if the new information proves to be accurate, Armacost sees no new prosecutorial advantage in the new information.  Nevertheless, the State Deparment maintains a «fundamental interest» in investigating the deaths of American citizens abroad and «would consider it a very serious matter if senior [Chilean government] officials had been aware of the circumstances of Horman’s death and attempted to conceal this information from the [U.S. government] and Horman’s family.»  Armacost directs that the informant be interviewed by State Department officials stationed in Uruguay to determine his credibility.

 

 

 

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U.S. Embassy Santiago, «[Deleted] Reports on GOC [Government of Chile] Involvement in Death of Charles Horman, Asks Embassy for Asylum and Aid,» April 28, 1987
Nearly fourteen years after the coup, an informant seeking political asylum at the U.S. Embassy in Chile offers an account of Horman’s death.  Horman was picked up in a routine sweep, the informant suggests, and was found in possession of «extremist» materials.  He was then taken the National Stadium where he was interrogated and later executed on the orders of Pedro Espinoza.  Embassy officials note that his story «corresponds with what we know about the case and the [Chilean government] attempt to cover up their involvement,» suggesting that the informant is probably telling the truth.

 

 

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This letter, one of a number sent by FBI attache Robert Scherrer to Chilean General Ernesto Baeza, provides intelligence obtained through the interrogation of a captured Chilean leftist, , . The document records U.S. collaboration with Chile’s security forces, including the promise of surveillance of subjects inside the United States. Fuentes was detained through Operation Condor–a network of Chilean, Argentinian and Paraguayan secret police agencies which coordinated tracking, capturing and killing opponents. According to the Report of the Chilean National Commission on Truth and Reconciliation, he was tortured in Paraguay, turned over to the Chilean secret police, and disappeared.

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 Federal Bureau of Investigation, «Frank Teruggi,» December 14, 1972
Among the hundreds of newly-released records is an FBI report from late-1972 on Teruggi’s attendance of a conference of the Committee of Returned [Peace Corp] Volunteers in 1971, and his membership in the «Chicago Area Group on the Liberation of the Americas.»  This document makes it clear that Teruggi was, at a minimum, under surveillance while in the United States and raises the question as to whether or not this information was shared with the Chilean military.

 

 

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